Chinese Translation by @mwardtweeting

One of the fondest memories I have of my father is when he told me and my siblings a bedtime story. He only came home two nights a week as he worked outside the city, so it was already a treat to see him. On those occasions when he wasn’t too tired, he’d transport us to the magical place of his childhood.

My father grew up climbing mountains, chasing birds, and battling dragons in southern China. When my mother playfully scolded him for telling fantastical stories, he’d give us a knowing smile and continue. Mom was a realist and afraid my father’s wild imagination would scare us to the point where we couldn’t fall sleep.

I loved my father’s stories. While he may have slain dragons and caught fish with his bare hands, he also managed to weave in practical lessons about working hard and the importance of kindness and humility. He’s been gone fifteen years, and I miss him still, especially at this frantic time of year.

Like my father, M. Ward is a wonderful storyteller, and he’s worth adding to your music list. I’ll feature him again in the coming year.

Listen to “Chinese Translation” and feel free to share any wisdom you draw from it. The lyrics and video brought tears to my eyes. It’s the perfect tune to close off my Monday music posts for 2018.

Have a wonderful week,

eden

I sailed a wild, wild sea
Climbed up a tall, tall mountain
I met an old, old man
Beneath the weeping, willow tree

He said now if you got some questions
Go and lay them at my feet
But my time here is brief
So you’ll have to pick just three

And I said
What do you do with the pieces of a broken heart
And how can a man like me remain in the light
And if life is really as short as they say
Then why is the night so long
And then the sun went down
And he sang for me this song

See I once was a young fool like you
Afraid to do the things
That I knew I had to do
So I played an escapade just like you
I played an escapade just like you

I sailed a wild, wild sea
Climbed up a tall, tall mountain
I met an old, old man
He sat beneath the sapling tree
He said now if you got some questions
Go and lay them at my feet
But my time here is brief
So you’ll have to pick just three

And I said
What do you do with the pieces of a broken heart
And how can a man like me remain in the light
And if life is really as short as they say
Then why is the night so long
And then the sun went down
And he played for me this song

18 thoughts on “Chinese Translation by @mwardtweeting

  1. I loved your memories you shared about your father’s stories to you as a child. What an amazing gift he gave you! Perfect song for this week. I’ve never heard it but connected to it quickly. Have an amazing week.

    1. Have a great week too Denise. I think it’s a fab song and a fitting one to finish the year – contemplative, intelligent, and musically stirring.

  2. What lovely childhood memories, Eden. Your gift of storytelling is hard-wired in your DNA. I bet your dad is smiling from above. xo

  3. What a great song! I love the lyrics and the graphics. So interesting that you get your storytelling genes from your dad…he’d be one very proud papa! xoxo

  4. Hi Eden, That is a nice whimsical number with a beautiful story to it. I love that sort of animation also. It was a shame that I had to use a VPN to access the music, as I was getting blocked with a copyright warning about it not being allowed here in the UK! In a way that was quite ironic, I only had the VPN on here because of working in China and needing it there to subvert the authorities. Funny that I had to use it to confuse a copyright issue in the west by confusing the air waves with a U.S.A. location. Don’t you just love those little situations that seem to upend the norms.

    1. Hi Brian, how odd. I think the access setting for each video is set by whomever uploads it. I’m glad you were able to listen to it though. It is a beautiful story and I loved the animation too.

  5. I hadn’t heard this song in a long while. Always liked it a lot. It poses profound questions that are answered indirectly. I guess the implied answer is that a person has to find their true path in life. Easier said than done, though making the effort counts for a lot.

    1. Hi Neil, thanks for your insight. There are many truths for me in the song, and making the effort is certainly one of them. What is clear is that we continue to ask the same questions over and over. We want to know about love and the loss of love, as well as the meaning of life. Not easy questions … and unlikely to be answered in one’s lifetime. The hope is that we can learn from the past.

  6. My dad’s fanciful stories tended to be about his working day- he was a mailman, and he’d often describe being lucky to come home without losing a leg to the latest man eating dog on his walk, describing it as ten feet long, breathing fire, bursting through brick walls and lunging for him.

  7. I like your father’s stories and the music. It’s a timely entry – tomorrow is the anniversary of my dad’s passing. And the sun is shining today. I’m glad the clouds have parted.

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